Virginia Real Estate License Courses

Compare the Best Real Estate Courses in Virginia

Virginia is a great place to be in the real estate business, thanks to a market that includes everything from stately Colonial houses to beach condos and modern suburban homes. To work in Virginia’s real estate industry, you need to qualify for and pass the Virginia real estate salesperson license exam. The first step is finding a pre-license course to help you get ready for the exam and learn what you need to know for your new career. We’re here to help you take that step with information, reviews, and comparisons of the top real estate courses in Virginia.

School Packages Starting At User Rating Visit Site

$279

(4.4 / 5)
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Hondros.com

$259

(4.1 / 5)
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TheCEShop.com

$169

(4 / 5)
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RealEstateExpress.com

$210

(3.6 / 5)
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Kapre.com

$130

(3.5 / 5)
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360Training.com

$169

(3.3 / 5)
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AlliedSchools.com

Real Estate Pre-License Course Reviews

There are many real estate education schools in Virginia, and they’re all required by law to teach the same topics, so how can you tell which one’s the best fit for you? For most students, factors like the quality of the teachers and course materials, class days and times, cost, and extra features like professional development and exam prep classes are what set different schools apart. We’ve done the research and put together the data to make it easy for you to see how selected schools stack up.

For most real estate students, the cost of the course and how it’s taught are the biggest factors in choosing a school. Our reviews of the top Virginia real estate courses will help you decide which one best meets all your needs—quality, convenience, learning style, and budget.

Classroom or Online Real Estate Courses?

One of the first decisions to make is whether to take your pre-license course in a traditional classroom setting or take it online. People who thrive on group discussion and have time to attend classes on a set schedule will likely prefer a campus-based program. If there’s not a classroom course near you, or if you have to fit your real estate studies around your other work and family responsibilities, an online course that lets you start anytime and work at your own pace may be the best option.

If you’re considering taking an online course but you’re worried about course quality, remember that real estate schools are required by Virginia law to cover a set list of topics, so you’ll cover all the material whether you’re studying on your phone or in a classroom. In fact, schools that offer both in-class and online courses often use the same textbooks and lectures for both tracks.

Virginia Real Estate License Requirements

Make sure you can meet Virginia’s requirements for becoming a licensed real estate salesperson before you enroll in a course. Unlike some states, Virginia does not require you to be a Virginia resident in order to apply. You must be a legal adult (age 18 or older) and a lawful resident of the United States with a high school diploma or an equivalent education. If you meet those basic requirements, there are four steps to earning your license.

  1. Complete a state-approved 60-hour pre-license course. This requirement is the same for students with no real estate experience and those who already have a sales license in another state and are applying for their Virginia license by reciprocity. Some of the topics every Virginia pre-license course must include are:
  • concepts of home ownership
  • forms of real estate ownership
  • real estate contracts
  • taxes and liens
  • title transfer and records
  • real estate financing
  • appraisal
  • leases and property management
  • fair housing and real estate ethics
  1. After you complete your pre-license course, the second step is to sign up to take the real estate salesperson license exam. If you’re new to real estate, you’ll need to take both the national and Virginia portions of the exam. If you already hold a license in another jurisdiction and are applying for a reciprocal Virginia’s license, you will only need to take the Virginia portion of the exam.
  2. The next step is getting your fingerprints taken at one of the approved PSI testing places in Virginia for a background check. If you’re out of state and can’t get to a location, you’ll need to get in touch with the state’s Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation (DPOR) to make other arrangements for your fingerprints.
  3. Once your background check is done, you have 45 days to complete the final step: Complete and mail your license application. Your package will need to include a completely filled out application form that you’ll download from the DPOR website, all your supporting documentation as required by the application, your background check results, and your license fee. If you’re applying for a reciprocal license you must also include current (less than 60 days old) copies of your license certificates from all the jurisdictions where you have a real estate license now or have had a license in the past.

Fast Facts About Virginia Real Estate

Virginia is one of the top five US states for business, thanks to an educated population, strong labor supply, and business-friendliness. With Washington DC next door and major employers that include federal contractors, military installations, shipyards, healthcare systems, and universities, the state consistently ranks well on measures of economic health. The state’s natural beauty, from mountains to beaches, contributes to Virginia’s high overall quality of life.

  • The median home value across Virginia was $252,900 in November 2018. (Source: Zillow)
  • Among Virginia cities, median home values in November 2018 ranged from $172,500 in Newport News to $642,800 in Arlington. (Source: Zillow)
  • The median home price statewide increased by 4.8% between 2014 and 2017. (Source: Forbes)
  • The Virginia Association of Realtors is the state’s largest trade group with more than 32,000 members. (Source: Virginia Association of Realtors)

More on the Top Schools in Virginia


The CE Shop

The CE shop delivers real estate math and exam prep resources with each of the three pre-license packages it offers in Virginia. The basic course also includes unlimited practice tests and a money-back guarantee. The value package adds professional development classes for building a real estate business, and the premium package tops off all those resources with post-licensing classes that all new agents must complete before license renewal. The CE Shop offers a tuition-discount program for active-duty military members, veterans, and their family members. The CE Shop pass rate in 2017 was 65% for state and 72% for national exams.

(4.1 / 5)

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Real Estate Express

Real Estate Express gives Virginia pre-license students the choice of buying individual classes a la carte or getting a package that includes three real estate books, help from an education concierge, and an online student forum for studying and questions. Pricier packages add value with exam prep classes, a guarantee that graduates will pass the exam or get a refund, post-license classes, a live course Q&A session, and a year’s worth of professional development support. RE Express had a 2016 pass rate of 75.92%.

(4 / 5)

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Brightwood

Brightwood uses curriculum developed by Kaplan to give students the 60 hours of pre-license education they need to qualify for the Virginia real estate salesperson exam. Virginia students can select one of three options: the basic 60-hour online real estate principles course, an on demand package that includes live webinar study groups plus national and state exam topic review, or the Career Launcher package that adds a two-day intensive class plus four weeks of coaching in real estate career-building.

(3.6 / 5)

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360 Training

360training offers online-only pre-license courses that cover all 60 hours required by the state of Virginia. Students can buy individual courses or choose a course package that includes all the required topics plus a session on real estate math or real estate math plus client communications. All of the school’s courses are presented in PDF format, so students can download and print the course materials for highlighting and study or review them online.

(3.5 / 5)

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Allied Business Schools

Allied provides self-paced online pre-license education in Virginia through its partner school, Real Estate Express. The courses are approved by the Commonwealth of Virginia, ARELLO, and IDECC, and they are delivered via Real Estate Express’ easy-to-use learning platform for computers and mobile devices. For more information, see the Real Estate Express page.

(3.3 / 5)

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How We Rate the Courses

When we evaluate a real estate course, we look at five main areas to develop our rating. Those areas are quality, convenience, comprehensiveness, student engagement level, and overall value.

  1. Quality. Is the course easy for students to sign up for, access, and complete? Does the curriculum include real world examples and scenarios you can expect to deal with once you become a real estate agent? Is the course material up to date to reflect the current laws and regulations? Do students get state-specific information along with broader national real estate knowledge. Is the school’s technology up to date and easy to use?
  2. Convenience. Does the school offer classes at times that accommodate different work schedules? Does the curriculum come with study tools like exam prep packages or online discussion groups to help students really absorb the course content? Are the course materials available online? During what hours are customer service, technical support, and instructors available for students who need help?
  3. Comprehensiveness. Does the course cover all the information you’ll need to know when you take the Virginia real estate salesperson license exam? How much detail does the course go into on state-specific topics?
  4. Student engagement. What do past students say about the quality of the classroom instructors? For online courses, is the curriculum interactive, with pop-up questions, animations, graphics, and videos, or does it rely on only one type of instruction? Is there a way for students to assess their knowledge as they progress through the course?
  5. Value. Is the course priced fairly for the quality it offers? How does it compare to other courses that are similar in price or quality?